The Story Continues

Wednesday, September 24, 2008 6 Comments A+ a-

For whatever reason, I couldn't sleep. I decided to make my nightly trip to the bathroom, an ever-expanding belly will do that to a woman. I glanced into Devyn's bedroom before ducking into the bathroom and my eyes made out an empty bed. I stood there, completely perplexed and began to rub the sleep out of my eyes. I did a double-take, scanned the floors of her rooms for a blanket and a pillow, and decided that no, my eyes weren't deceiving me. Devyn was not in her bed, or in her room.

I felt my heart begin to race and I turned back to our bedroom. I turned on the bathroom light, enough to illuminate our bed and noticed there, right beside her daddy's knees were two small feet sticking out from the covers.

With a relieved grin, I closed the door to the bathroom, and completed my business. When I returned to the bedroom, I picked Devyn up into my arms and moved her from one side of our bed, to the other. Because I know as much as her daddy loves her, he'll sleep better without her there. And because I know that I'll sleep much better with her tucked up against my side.

We lay there, the three of us. Daddy, child, mommy. Every so often, I felt a kick from within, reminding me that soon our family of four will turn into a family of five. But there's something about the first child, the eldest, the one that made us parents to begin with. And as I lay there, still unable to sleep, I reflected on the day before. God was good to us, He has provided for us in ways I never dreamed, and I couldn't be happier with the results from Devyn's assessment.

On our way to the meeting with the speech and occupational therapists yesterday, Jon and I took a moment to pray. We prayed for guidance, we prayed for strength, we prayed for peace. We prayed that we'd be open to the results, to the therapists' ideas and treatment plans, we prayed for the right teachers and therapists that would soon be a part of our child's life. But mostly we prayed that to whatever end, Devyn and her story would be used for God's glory.

The results meeting was everything we'd hoped for and more. The occupational therapist went first, going over everything that she'd observed. Her conclusion was not only that Devyn's motor skills were exactly where they should be, some of her skills were advanced for a four-year-old. She felt there was no reason to be concerned about Devyn's motor skills. Praise the Lord! The speech therapist went next, again noting the strengths and weaknesses of Devyn's speech. The number of her vocabulary words are exactly where she should be, the letters that she pronounces correctly, and her observations of unclear enunciation, switching letters and words around, substituting b's for v's, k's for g's, etc. and mixing up she/her and he/him pronouns. All in all, nothing was said that was a shock or surprise to Jon and I.

Because of her inability to be understood, except by those of us who love and interact with Devyn on a daily basis, Devyn qualifies for speech therapy through the school district. The speech therapist suggested a therapy group once a week, for two hours a week. Basically, Devyn will be one of six children who all have similar speech difficulties. There is both a teacher and a speech therapist in the room; Devyn will alternate between playing with the other children and working one-on-one with the therapist. We were able to meet both the teacher and Devyn's therapist yesterday and personally, I've already fallen in love with both of them. There is an obvious love and passion, both for the children themselves and for what they do in their lives.

And the best part? The speech therapist believes that Devyn probably won't need this extra therapy for more than a year or 18 months at the latest. So here we sit, a mere three months after Devyn's initial speech therapy had to end due to changes in Jon's insurance, a renewed hope for Devyn and her speech. Where in private therapy, she was going for an hour every other week, she is now being moved to a play group with a very low student-to-teacher ratio for two hours every... single.... week. God is so good and provides mightily, wouldn't you agree?!

Well, that's it. I'm off to snuggle my daughter a little more and hopefully drift back to sleep.

I’m a coffee drinking, book reading, laundry procrastinating, husband and children loving, mess of a woman who believes that chips and salsa can fix anything. We have chickens running around the backyard, a mountain of dishes in the sink, and on any given morning, I have at least 10 school forms that need my signature or initials. It’s a crazy life {I prefer to call it controlled chaos}, but its ours.

6 comments

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Aspiemom
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9:02 AM delete

I love your description of what went on during the night! That is so tender.

I'm happy that the assessment appointments went off much better than you ever anticipated. I've been there, as my son has Aspergers, and the waiting and not knowing is difficult. God doesn't give us more than He knows we can handle, though. I'm glad that you had such good news!

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12:35 PM delete

Yay!! What wonderful news! I'm so glad you decided to blog about it at 3:30am! You are crazy girl!

When Kaydence switched to a big girl bed one morning I went in her room and she was gone! Turns out she was sleeping under the bed... I guess she missed the enclosed feeling.

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Elise
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2:40 PM delete

Praise God, Jenn- what a beautiful way to share your good news! You are such a good writer, you bless always with your words.
Hug Miss Devyn for me!

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Paula
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12:15 PM delete

Sweet!! I am so glad she is coming along so well. I am glad you still get your snuggle time. Most important!!

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MamaEscandon
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5:41 PM delete

Glad to hear things are going well! I visit often... but rarely do I have time to comment!

I am curious though, how did you know she had a speech problem. My daughter turned two in August and she does say things that other people can't understand and isn't putting together sentences for the exception of two words like eat milk. Anyway, my husband thinks I am crazy but I don't want to be one of those mother's who refuses to realize their child might not be perfect... I also don't want to be too concerned and in a hurry to "fix" her. I just don't know what the benchmark is or when its time to really worry.

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